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Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - Printable Version

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Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - AbagailBenjamin - 12-14-2012

Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion?


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - lucrezaborgia - 12-15-2012

Probably Hinduism with Buddhism a close second.


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - myotch - 12-15-2012

Islam has 1.6 billion (more or less) adherents. Hinduism has around 950 million. Buddhism around 376 million, though many who hold Buddhist beliefs are not necessarily Buddhists - (some are Hindu, Taoist, or Shintoist, and some even hold to folk religion).

Atheism/agnosticism is prevalent in Europe, Eastern Europe, Russian region, and Asia, while seemingly rare in Africa.


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - lucrezaborgia - 12-15-2012

I'd consider Islam to be a Christian religion because they profess faith in the same god.


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - Jeremy C - 12-15-2012

(12-15-2012, 03:06 PM)lucrezaborgia Wrote: I'd consider Islam to be a Christian religion because they profess faith in the same god.

I disagree. They share a similar heritage, but they have distinct views of God. Tell most Muslims they believe in a Trinity and you'll face similar disagreement.

Are we talking most dominant in terms of numbers, or in terms of overall world impact?


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - FmrMarine - 12-15-2012

I think by numbers alone, it would have to be Islam, which is certainly not a Christian religion.


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - myotch - 12-15-2012

Yeah, Islam and Christianity are totally different. Different structure, different soteriology, different practices and beliefs, and different importance placed on those practices and beliefs.

I would consider Islam to be somewhat an offshoot of Christianity, seeing that the Koran has some things to say about Christianity and some Christian figures like Christ and Mary, but even "offshoot" would be stretching it, as the Koran got some major facts wrong (or different from Judeo-Christian sacred texts).

Also, Islam does not ascribe to God's name as Jehovah. They worship Allah.


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - dramaturge - 12-15-2012

(12-15-2012, 05:23 PM)myotch Wrote: Also, Islam does not ascribe to God's name as Jehovah. They worship Allah.

Probably because God's name isn't actually Jehovah. And "Allah" is like us saying "God." So.... Not really an argument against Islam being a Christian religion.

Islam is certainly an Abrahamic religion. I would say that offshoot of Christianity probably fits it fairly well, esp. as Mohammed was educated in both Judaic and Christian teaching. I believe some early church father considered it a form of heretical Christianity, if that makes sense.

Of religions outside of the Abrahamic sphere, Hinduism certainly would be the most dominant by sheer numbers. One could argue that Buddhism wins on influence, though, since many people ascribe to some level of Buddhism while being primarily some other religion. Though there is a significant argument to be made that Buddhism isn't a religion at all. *ponders*


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - lucrezaborgia - 12-16-2012

I meant Abrahamic. Gah...


RE: Which is the most dominant non-Christian religion? - Jeremy C - 12-16-2012

(12-16-2012, 11:39 AM)lucrezaborgia Wrote: I meant Abrahamic. Gah...

Ah, then yes, absolutely.
That'd be an interesting census/polling concept, grouping religions together based on their area of most ancient origin. I wonder how it would change the general demographics we split the world into.